Friday, March 30, 2012

Paul in Rotterdam 24-3-2012 HD


McCartney in Rotterdam

Ahoy Rotterdam paulmccartney.filminspector.com




As the first stop on his "On the Run" world tour, Paul McCartney appeared at Ahoy Rotterdam located in, you guessed it, Rotterdam. This was a very nice production throughout. Paul's lead guitarist rocks and the concert sounds perfect. Paul can still hit those notes, so reports of the demise of his voice are premature.

Ahoy Rotterdam paulmccartney.filminspector.com


This wasn't the first time that Paul had played Ahoy Rotterdam. Wings, for instance, played the venue on 25 March 1976. Paul also played Ahoy Rotterdam as a solo act in 2009 on his Good Evening Europe tour. In the 2012 concert, Paul and his band (never forget it's not just him out there!) spent three full hours onstage and gave two encores. Notable changes to the setlist included the return of Venus and Mars/Rock Show and "My Valentine" from "Kisses on the Bottom."

Ahoy Rotterdam paulmccartney.filminspector.com

The lineup: Paul 'Wix' Wickens (vocals, keyboards, guitar, percussion, harmonica), Brian Ray (vocals, guitar, bass), Rusty Anderson (vocals, guitar) and Abe Laboriel Jr (vocals, drums). This is Paul's standard lineup, and in fact is the band he has worked with the longest in his entire career.




2018

Paul McCartney sings "Something," Ahoy Rotterdam 24-3-2012


Paul's Tribute to George Harrison

Paul McCartney George Harrison Ahoy Rotterdam paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Paul McCartney honors George Harrison at Ahoy Rotterdam.



Paul McCartney sings George Harrison's "Something" at Ahoy Rotterdam. It is nice to see an artist of Paul's caliber who treats his fans with respect by dressing like it is an important occasion. Very rare these days. Paul shows some great photographs of George on the big screen. George had been dead just over ten years at this point, so it is an indication of respect that Paul went out of his way to honor him.

Paul McCartney George Harrison Ahoy Rotterdam paulmccartney.filminspector.com


2018

The Night Before Live at Ahoy, Rotterdam - 24-03-2012


Ahoy Rotterdam paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Paul McCartney rocks Ahoy Rotterdam.



Paul McCartney played "The Night Before," one of the early Beatles classics, at Ahoy Rotterdam in 2012. Paul is looking very dapper in his business suit. Naturally, he sheds the jacket and vest before long. Nice performance, three hours of classics and two encores, one of the great McCartney performances. The concert must have been awesome.

Ahoy Rotterdam paulmccartney.filminspector.com

McCartney's band was (and is) Paul 'Wix' Wickens (vocals, keyboards, guitar, percussion, harmonica), Brian Ray (vocals, guitar, bass), Rusty Anderson (vocals, guitar) and Abe Laboriel Jr (vocals, drums).

The setlist for Ahoy Rotterdam (including two encores):

Hello, Goodbye
Junior's Farm
All My Loving
Venus And Mars
Rock Show
Jet
Drive My Car
Sing The Changes
The Night Before
Let Me Roll It
Paperback Writer
The Long And Winding Road
Nineteen Hundred And Eighty-Five
My Valentine
Maybe I'm Amazed
I've Just Seen A Face
I Will
Blackbird
Here Today
Dance Tonight
Mrs. Vanderbilt
Eleanor Rigby
Ram On
Something
Yellow Submarine
Band On The Run
Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
Back In The USSR
I've Got A Feeling
A Day In The Life/Give Peace A Chance
Let It Be
Live and Let Die
Hey Jude

Encore:
The Word/All You Need Is Love/She Loves You
Day Tripper
Get Back

Encore 2:
Yesterday
Helter Skelter
Golden Slumbers
Carry That Weight
The End


2018

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Paul McCartney Fan Interaction


Paul McCartney Ahoy Rotterdam paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Paul McCartney at Rotterdam, March 2012.



Paul McCartney with some fan interaction at his March 24, 2012, Rotterdam show. Paul is great about interacting with fans - since he's typically on stage for three hours, that's understandable, as he spends a lot of time in front of audiences. This is a great way for performers to build a bond with fans, but few are as good at it as Paul McCartney. The Netherlands is a favorite stop for Paul, who has played there at least a dozen times since 1972. Paul played "Venus And Mars/Rock Show" for the first time in a while, and also introduced "My Valentine" from his then-new album "Kisses on the Bottom."

Paul McCartney Ahoy Rotterdam paulmccartney.filminspector.com


Paul McCartney's band:
  • Paul 'Wix' Wickens (vocals, keyboards, guitar, percussion, harmonica)
  • Brian Ray (vocals, guitar, bass)
  • Rusty Anderson (vocals, guitar)
  • Abe Laboriel Jr (vocals, drums).
This lineup has been unchanged for about a decade as of this writing.

2018

My Valentine Live at Ahoy Rotterdam on 24-03-2012


Paul McCartney sings "My Valentine" in Rotterdam for the first time in March 2012.



Paul McCartney's album "Kisses on the Bottom" included his original composition "My Valentine." Written as a sort of ode to American standards, the song sounds as if it was written in the 1930s or 1940s, which is one of Paul's unique gifts. The first time that Paul performed "My Valentine" was at the 24 March 2012 Ahoy Rotterdam show. You be the judge, but I think that it sounds pretty good live. "My Valentine" also suits Paul's mature voice better than a lot of his earlier tunes, which is not surprising since he just wrote it. It's nice to hear this version of "My Valentine" because it gets just an occasional hint of a rock edge that is completely absent on the album version. Rotterdam was the first stop on Paul's world tour.



Paul McCartney's band at Ahoy Rotterdam was Paul 'Wix' Wickens (vocals, keyboards, guitar, percussion, harmonica), Brian Ray (vocals, guitar, bass), Rusty Anderson (vocals, guitar) and Abe Laboriel Jr (vocals, drums).


2018

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Goodbye (Paul McCartney demo) and Mary Hopkin

Mary Hopkin paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Paul McCartney and Mary Hopkins in the 1960s.



Paul was in a generous mood in the late 1960s, giving away some quality songs to others. He gave his composition "Goodbye" to Welsh singer Mary Hopkin. Hopkin had a big hit with it. Some say that Paul's demo, which as usual he did in his spare time all by himself during an odd hour or two waiting for the other Beatles to show up at the recording studio, is better than Hopkin's finished product. Paul's own demo version ultimately found its way onto one of the Beatles' Anthology albums despite the fact that it wasn't a Beatles project, just all Paul, all the time. There also is a 2015 remastered version of Paul's version of "Goodbye."

Hopkin had a No. 1 hit in the United Kingdom with "Those Were The Days" (produced by Paul McCartney) and "Goodbye" was the followup. Written by McCartney (and credited to McCartney/Lennon), "Goodbye was released on 26 March 1969 and reached No. 2 on the UK Singles Chart. It would have been another No. 1 McCartney composition, but was kept out of No. 1 by "Get Back" by the Beatles. Of course, that's the immutable fact, but you can consider "Goodbye" another No. 1 for McCartney because it was kept out of the top spot only by Paul's own song. "Goodbye" peaked at No. 13 in the United States on the Billboard 100. If it hadn't been blocked by his own song, "Goodbye" would make all the lists of Macca No. 1 compositions - close but no cigars. As it is, it's practically forgotten aside from people who heard it on the radio in 1969.

Reportedly, Hopkin wasn't really happy as a high-profile singer - she was a low-key folk singer - so the title of "Goodbye" basically was a commentary on Paul McCartney's musical relationship with her after several years (nobody ever accused Paul of subtlety about his relationships, but this one appeared to be purely professional). McCartney and Hopkin did work together a bit into 1970, but that was it. It sounds as if it was a very mutual parting, and Paul had a lot of other things on his mind, such as his marriage around this time to Linda Eastwood and the beginning of his own solo career.

Hopkin never again had the same kind of success that she enjoyed while working with Paul McCartney, but that didn't seem to bother Hopkin. However, Mary Hopkin remained in show business sporadically while raising a family with Tony Visconti and had her own 6-episode television series. She also worked at times with other Beatles people, such as George Harrison and George Martin. Mary Hopkin's children have become singers and occasionally accompany Mary on folk tunes.




2018

Spin It On by Wings


Spin It On paulmccartney.filminspector.com
"Spin It On" by Wings.



"Spin It On" is late Wings, and how you view that depends on your particular musical tastes. "Spin It On" is the third full song on "Back to the Egg," a concept album that didn't really play well (no pun intended). Paul is trying something different as usual, and, as later events suggest, he apparently was growing bored with the limitations of Wings. Paul wrote "Spin It On" in Scotland and appears to give a nod to then-popular punk and new-wave influences. The concept of "Back to the Egg" is that someone is spinning the radio dial and getting different kinds of music. Another song with a similar vibe is "Old Siam, Sir," so apparently whoever was flipping the dial landed on the same station twice. "Spin It On" became the B-side to "Old Siam Sir" in the United Kingdom and to "Getting Closer" in the United States, but the singles are little remembered because they did not do particularly well by Wings standards.

Spin It On paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Paul McCartney and Denny Laine on the "Spin It On" video.

My take on "Spin It On" is that Paul is trying a Van Halen vibe since that band was very popular in the late 1970s (and in some quarters still is). "Spin It On" didn't really fit well with Wings with its heavy rock vibe, but, well, nice try! The failure of the "Spin It On" single(s) basically spelled the end of Wings, though nobody could see that at the time. As with many McCartney misfires, Paul hasn't done much with "Spin It On" since its singles. "Spin It On" was not included on the "McCartney Years" DVD set, for instance. However, as with virtually every Paul song, there are some who love "Spin It On" and call it one of their favorite McCartney songs, and that's understandable for those who like the punk-rock kind of songs. If you want proof that Paul McCartney can "handle" punk rock, here it is, but it doesn't seem to be his cup of tea.


Back to the Egg paulmccartney.filminspector.com


2018

The McCartney family talk about 'Linda McCartney, Life In Photographs'


Mary McCartney Stella McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Mary and Stella McCartney.



Paul McCartney gathers with two of his children to discuss the book "Linda McCartney, Life in Photographs." This is interesting for several reasons. For one, Linda's photographs don't get as much recognition as they merit, given her career being overshadowed by Paul's legendary career. Another reason is that it is kind of rare to see the McCartney kids together this up close and personal. Mary, in particular, keeps a low profile - there's no reason she shouldn't - but the point is that this is a rare opportunity to see her. I should be a little more specific - unless you frequent certain social circles Mary keeps a low profile, though there have been occasional references to her at various events. I'm sure there are people who see Mary all the time, she just doesn't get much airtime. Stella, of course, is in the public scene all the time due to her fashion line.

Just as a "for instance" why you might find this interesting, Stella has a fairly distinctive accent to American ears. In a sense, she takes after her father circa 1967, though her accent doesn't sound particularly Liverpudlian. Mary, on the other hand, has a much, much softer accent that is not American exactly, but shall we say mid-Atlantic. Mary also looks a bit younger, to me at least, despite being a couple of years older. Draw your own conclusions. The differences are subtle but noticeable.

Of course, they're not kids any longer, and certainly wouldn't want to be referred to as such, but Beatles fans may be like me and always think of them from the "Ram" and "Wings Over America" days.

Linda McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Linda McCartney: Life in Photographs.
Linda McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com


2018

Monkberry Moon Delight


Monkberry Moon Delight paulmccartney.filminspector.com



"Monkberry Moon Delight" is one of Paul McCartney's most under-recognized tracks, and it's amazing that so many fans don't rank this among Paul's top tracks. It is an album track on "Ram," which some fans consider to be Paul's best solo album (leaving aside both the Beatles and Wings, of course, cuts out a lot of competition). It features truly heroic vocals from Paul and some really strong backing vocals from Linda and their daughter Heather (a very rare musical contribution from Heather).

Monkberry Moon Delight paulmccartney.filminspector.com


Paul has this to say about "Monkberry Moon Delight":
When my kids were young they used to call milk 'monk' for whatever reason that kids do – I think it's magical the way that kids can develop better names for things than the real ones. In fact, as a joke, Linda and I still occasionally refer to an object by that child-language name. So, monk was always milk, and monkberry moon delight was a fantasy drink, rather like Love Potion No. 9, hence the line in the song, 'sipping monkberry moon delight'. It was a fantasy milk shake.
Whatever Paul's intention and inspiration, the lyrics (also credited to Linda for legal reasons) make virtually no sense. What do lines like "my hair is a tangled Beretta" mean? It appears that Paul is just reacting to momentary events in his life, such as when he sings "I don't get the gist of your letter." What letter? Who knows, Paul himself has probably forgotten by this point.

Monkberry Moon Delight paulmccartney.filminspector.com
A cover version of "Monkberry Moon Delight" that Paul McCartney liked so much that he played it before his own concerts in 1993.

Paul has stated (to Mojo magazine that "Monkberry Moon Delight I liked, so much so that it's in my poetry book." Why he likes it isn't exactly clear, but there are plenty of reasons for fans to like it. Paul punches through the lyrics like a hurricane, and he earned some respect from the music community for this when Screamin' Jay Hawkins covered "Monkberry Moon Delight" for his 1979 "Screamin' the Blues" album.

Monkberry Moon Delight paulmccartney.filminspector.com


"Monkberry Moon Delight" made it onto "Blackbird Singing," Paul's 2001 compilation of his favorite lyrics and poetry. So, obviously, the lyrics mean a lot to him even if they don't really much to some of us. Paul McCartney's delivery carries the song in my humble opinion. Make of the lyrics what you will. There is speculation that "Catch up, super fury" is aimed squarely at John Lennon, who was not being too complimentary of Paul at this juncture, but who knows. Note that some versions of the lyrics have it as:
Ketchup
(Ketchup)
Soup and puree
(Soup and puree)
However, "Catch up" makes more sense given its later use with "cats and kittens." As with everything else concerning "Monkberry Moon Delight," draw your own conclusions.

Incidentally, I can help a little on the first line of the song, as Paul likes to go up to his attic to compose. Other than that, you're on your own.



So I sat in the attic, a piano at my nose,
And the wind played a dreadful cantata. (cantata, cantata)
Sore was I from a crack of an enemy's hose
And the horrible sound of tomato. (tomato, tomato)

Catch up! (catch up!)
Super fury
Don't get left behind. (get left behind)
Catch up (catch up!)
Super fury (super fury)
Don't get left behind. (get left behind, get left behind, get left behind)

When a rattle of rats had awoken
The sinews, the nerves and the veins.
My piano was boldly outspoken
In attempts to repeat this refrain.

So I stood with a knot in my stomach,
And I gazed at that terrible sight,
Of two youngsters concealed in a barrel,
Smoking monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah) ho!
Monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight. (om pah om pah pah)

Oh -
Oh-oh, oh-oh.

Well, I know my banana is older than the rest
And my hair is a tangled beretta. (beretta, beretta)
But I leave my pajamas to billy budapest,
And I don't get the gist of your letter. (your letter, your letter)

Catch up, (catch up)
Cats and kittens (cats and kittens)
Don't get left behind. (get left behind)
Catch up, (catch up)
Cats and kittens (cats and kittens)
Don't get left behind. (get left behind, get left behind, get left behind)

Oh - monkberry moon delight, yeah, (om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, (om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, yeah, yeah, yeah, (om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
Oh, monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
Oh, monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, oh-oh, (om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
Suckin' monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
(om pah om pah pah)
(om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
(om pah om pah pah)
(om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
(om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
(om pah om pah pah)
Ah, monkberry moon delight, yeah, yeah,
(om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh,
(om pah om pah pah)
Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh....
(om pah om pah pah)
(om pah om pah pah)
Uh, monkberry moon delight.

"try some of this, honey! (om pah om pah pah)
"what is it?" (om pah om pah pah)

Monkberry moon delight, ah, ah, ah, ah, ah, ah,
(om pah om pah pah)
Ah, ah, ah, ah, ah....
(om pah om pah pah)
(ooh) monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
Uh, monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, (om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight, na-na-na-na-na-na-na-na....
(om pah om pah pah)
Monkberry moon delight.

Monkberry Moon Delight paulmccartney.filminspector.com


2018

Monday, March 26, 2012

Teddy Boy


Teddy Boy paulmccartney.filminspector.com




"Teddy Boy" is an album track from the 1970 "McCartney" album, released on 17 April 1970. As always with Paul, it has a nice melody. It also is fairly easy to play on the guitar if you are into that. Sounds to me like a throwback to the "White Album" days - which, in a sense, it is. Actually, Paul wrote "Teddy Boy" during his stay in India in 1968. The Beatles recorded six versions of "Teddy Boy" in January 1969 for what turned into the "Let It Be" album but passed on it.

Teddy Boy paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Paul McCartney in the Cavern Club, 1961.

"Teddy Boys," incidentally, was a term with which Paul would have been quite familiar. It was a name for young English toughs in the '50s who adopted peculiar throwback fashions and styles in the clothes they wore and the cars they drove. Digging even deeper into this, Ringo Starr played a Teddy Boy in the 1973 British film "That'll Be the Day," whose plot has certain general similarities to McCartney's song. The Beatles themselves ultimately released Paul's "Teddy Boy" on "Anthology 3" in 1996.

Teddy Boy paulmccartney.filminspector.com


And going to the final level on this, one of Paul's songs on follow-up album "Ram," "Monkberry Moon Delight," has a definite rockabilly feel to it. Early Teddy Boys were associated with that genre, so for some reason, these early influences on his life were on Paul's mind right after the breakup of the Beatles.



2018

Thursday, March 22, 2012

Golden Slumbers - Carry That Weight - The End (Original Version)


Paul McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com



I include this demo version of the Beatles' Golden Slumbers/ Carry That Weight/ The End (demo version) because it gives some insight into the creative process. This version is more Paul McCartney and not so much Beatles and is slightly different than the final "Abbey Road" album cut. Anyone can hear, though, that even this unpolished version of the end of Side 2 of "Abbey Road" is still brilliant in this raw form.

Golden Slumbers Paul McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com

Paul lets a little more emotion creep in than in the polished version. Can't get too many versions of this, in my opinion, the best single medley in rock history. This version was recorded during the "Let It Be" recording sessions in January 1969. Obviously, this composition was too good to let lay around with the mess of recordings from that period and was put on the very next album, "Abbey Road," and not the delayed "Let It Be." It is very common for Paul McCartney to close his concerts with Golden Slumbers. Carry That Weight/ The End, and it always is a crowd pleaser.

Paul McCartney Abbey Road paulmccartney.filminspector.com


2018

Waterfalls


Paul McCartney Waterfalls paulmccartney.filminspector.com
'Waterfalls" by Paul McCartney.



"Waterfalls" is perhaps Paul McCartney's most obscure Top Ten single of his entire career. If you asked even experts on the Beatles who wrote "Waterfalls," you'd get a lot of blank looks. The single made no impression whatsoever in the United States - it "peaked" at No. 106 - but in some markets, it did quite well. For instance, "Waterfalls" went to No. 4 in Ireland and No. 9 in Norway and the United Kingdom. Of course, in many markets, "Waterfalls" didn't chart at all. When Paul McCartney releases a song like "Waterfalls," especially as the follow-up to the rocking "Coming Up," you know he must be trying to make some kind of larger statement (one can imagine the looks on the faces of the record company executives when Paul said he wanted to release it). So, "Waterfalls" is a very unique single which appeals to a rarefied audience. But, within that audience, it is beloved, I suppose.

Paul McCartney Waterfalls paulmccartney.filminspector.com Paul McCartney Waterfalls paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Paul McCartney Waterfalls paulmccartney.filminspector.com Paul McCartney Waterfalls paulmccartney.filminspector.com


"Waterfalls" is off of the 1980 "McCartney II" album, which itself drew a very mixed reaction from the record-buying public. I will admit that "Waterfalls" is not to my taste, particularly, as I find Paul's tendency toward choir-boy vocals a bit off-putting (he does it much better a couple of years later in "Wanderlust"). The best thing about "Waterfalls" is the delightful accompanying music video, which is vividly colorful and juxtaposes Paul with a polar bear. How often do you get to see that? The "Waterfalls" video shows Paul in the middle of the composition process, which is completely fictional, of course, but still provides a nice sort of dream-sequence aspect to his songwriting skills. While "Waterfalls" is not to my own taste, I can understand why it did quite well in certain places with its ecological theme and sort of suburban-adventurer pose. The English love this track, maybe you will, too.

Paul McCartney Waterfalls paulmccartney.filminspector.com


2018

Come and Get It (live)


Paul McCartney Come and Get It paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Paul McCartney performs "Come and Get It" in Bologna, Italy, November 2011.



"Come and Get It" is one of Paul McCartney's most underrated songs. Paul performed it publicly for the first time in Bologna, Italy, November 2011. Many people do not associate "Come and Get It" with Paul because he handed the song off to Badfinger, but he wrote and produced the song for them. It's as much a McCartney song as "Yesterday" or "Let It Be."

Paul McCartney Come and Get It paulmccartney.filminspector.com


In 1969, Paul was hired to write the score for a Peter Sellers film, "The Magic Christian." He prepared "Come and Get It" for a new group that he assembled, "Badfinger." That song propelled Badfinger into the limelight and created an entire successful career for its members (and that is no exaggeration, they re-used this song in 1978 when they needed a new record contract). Aside from the (famous) demo of "Come and Get It" that he whipped out one morning before an "Abbey Road" session, Paul McCartney never recorded or performed this publicly at any other time prior to this (to my knowledge). Note that Paul speaks pretty good Italian, which I'm sure for him was about as easy as learning to play the drums or produce his own records or organize a world tour or any of the other amazing things that Paul McCartney does.

Paul McCartney Come and Get It paulmccartney.filminspector.com


  2018

The Song We Were Singing


Paul McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com




"The Song We Were Singing" is the first album track on Paul McCartney's "Flaming Pie." Paul wrote the song in Jamaica in early January 1995 in conjunction with Jeff Lynne. This was during the preparation of The Beatles Anthology. In a general sense, "The Songs We Were Singing" is another reverie on the order of "Here Today" and "Yesterday," a return to a backward-looking theme to which Paul repeatedly returns.

Paul McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com


Paul was inspired on 1997's "Flaming Pie" by the Anthology project:
I came off the back of The Beatles Anthology with an urge to do some new music. The Anthology was very good for me because it reminded me of The Beatles’ standards and the standards that we reached with the songs.
The Anthology project led to "Flaming Pie::
Watching the Anthology also reminded me of the time that we didn’t take to make an album and of the fun we had when we did one. The Beatles were not a serious group. So I wanted to try get back into some of that; to have some fun and not sweat it. That’s been the spirit of making this album [Flaming Pie]. You’ve got to have a laugh, because it’s just an album. So I called up a bunch of friends and family and we just got on and did it. And we had fun making it. Hopefully, you’ll hear that in the songs.
So Flaming Pie was a "fun" look back at his own past, and "The Songs We Were Singing" exemplifies that. The nostalgic feel extended back to the instruments that Paul used on the song - the stand-up bass used by Bill Black on "Heartbreak Hotel" and other hits among them.

Paul McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com


Paul at times wallows in nostalgia, and here he goes again. A pretty song, not my favorite, but well constructed and, as always, melodic.



Paul McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com


2018

Heaven On A Sunday


Heaven on a Sunday paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Paul McCartney out sailing.



"Heave on a Sunday" is a track on Paul McCartney's 1997 "Flaming Pie" album. "Heaven on a Sunday" is notable because Paul's son James, still a teenager, played guitar. Paul says the idea just came to him from the title phrase while he was out sailing in August 1996:
I was out sailing in a small boat; just me, the sail, the wind. Peaceful, like Heaven On A Sunday. That opening line led me through the song, I though it’d be nice to play with James, my son, so we traded phrases. Lovely to do.
Paul further noted:
This is the most recent of all the songs on Flaming Pie, written shortly before I finished the album. I like to sail when I’m on holiday: just me, the wind and a little boat – a Sunfish. I was having a very relaxing time, and this is when I came up with the song. The opening line led me through. I like the idea of heaven being busy in the week and peaceful on a Sunday, and I like mentioning Devon – there are a few places called Devon in America, plus the original here in England. 
And so are Paul McCartney songs born. I don't personally know of any places in the US called Devon, but I'm sure there are some - heck, there are places called Rome and Paris, so why not Devon?

Heaven on a Sunday paulmccartney.filminspector.com


Some folks think only Paul's 70's-80's stuff is any good. I like his more recent stuff, too. This one has a jazzy feel to it that he developed further in "My Valentine." Off the very successful "Flaming Pie" album.