Monday, March 19, 2012

Let 'em In

Paul's Mellow Tune from "Wings at the Speed of Sound"

Let Em In paulmccartney.filminspector.com



"Let 'em In" is a single taken from Paul McCartney and Wings' "Wings at the Speed of Sound." Released on 23 July 1976, "Let Em In" peaked at No. 2 in the United Kingdom and No. 3 in the United States and Canada. While not a No. 1 hit, "Let Em In" was a big seller and was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America.

Let Em In paulmccartney.filminspector.com


"Let Em In" is a deviously simply song which contains a great deal of artistry. It begins with the ubiquitous door-chime sound that actually is the first eight notes of the Westminster Quarters and has a false fade-out, an old trick used on some famous Beatles songs. "Let Em In" recites the names of some of Paul's actual relatives and some other famous people for unexplained reasons (Martin Luther and Phil and Don Everly, for instance). Uncle Ernie isn't a relative, it's actually a character sung by Ringo Starr in the London Symphony Orchestra's version of the Who's "Tommy." Why Paul chose these particular people to sing about is, as with many things, unexplained, but "Let Em In" is best viewed as a tone poem where names are chosen simply to fit the sounds of the song.

Let Em In paulmccartney.filminspector.com


"Let Em In" was a centerpiece of the Wings Over the World tour in 1975 and 1976. Denny Laine would don a drummer-boy uniform with a drum and make a big production out of pounding out the drum refrain that increases in intensity toward the end of "Let Em In." If you were around in 1975, "Let Em In" will probably remind you of that era.


Let Em In paulmccartney.filminspector.com

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