Tuesday, March 13, 2012

We Can Work it Out


We Can Work It Out paulmccartney.filminspector.com




"We Can Work It Out" is a Paul McCartney and John Lennon composition for the Beatles that went to No. 1. Released as a double-A side with "Day Tripper," "We Can Work It Out" went to No. 1 both in the United States and the United Kingdom, along with several other countries (including Canada, Ireland, and Australia). Paul came up with the idea for the song, and John added the middle eight. The Day Tripper/We Can Work It Out single is one of the most successful singles in history and overshadowed only by some of the Beatles' own later successes. "We Can Work It Out, released on 3 December 1965, was the top-selling single of 1965 in Britain, an astonishing feat considering that it was released in December and competing not just against the rest of the world, but also classic Beatles work such as "Help!"

We Can Work It Out paulmccartney.filminspector.com


Paul has said regarding "We Can Work It Out":
I had the idea, the title, had a couple of verses and the basic idea for it, then I took it to John to finish it off and we wrote the middle together. Which is nice: 'Life is very short. There's no time for fussing and fighting, my friend.' Then it was George Harrison's idea to put the middle into waltz time, like a German waltz. That came on the session, it was one of the cases of the arrangement being done on the session.
McCartney also has said:
The lyrics might have been personal. It is often a good way to talk to someone or to work your own thoughts out. It saves you going to a psychiatrist, you allow yourself to say what you might not say in person.
John Lennon agreed with Paul's primary authorship:
In We Can Work It Out, Paul did the first half, I did the middle eight. But you've got Paul writing, 'We can work it out, we can work it out' – real optimistic, y'know, and me impatient: 'Life is very short and there's no time for fussing and fighting, my friend.'
"We Can Work It Out" is one of the great examples of how the collaboration between John Lennon and Paul McCartney worked during the Beatles' "middle years," after they had stopped collaborating on the entire creation of songs but before they stopped working together at all. One would have an idea, get to a certain point, and then bring it to the other to add the "special sauce" in the middle that led to epic classics like "We Can Work It Out" and "A Day in the Life." As usual, John adds a biting middle eight that contrasts sharply with Paul's sunny body of the song.

We Can Work It Out paulmccartney.filminspector.com


"We Can Work It Out" is one of the most interesting of Paul's songs for several reasons. For instance, it was one of the first songs for which the band intentionally made a promotional film (later to be called music videos). Earlier films were taken from other work, such as clips from "A Hard Day's Night." Another reason is that it was the first "Double A-side single" due to Lennon's insistence that "Day Tripper" not be shortchanged. It was a little-known showdown of musical titans, and Lennon lost. "We Can Work It Out" debuted at No. 1 in the UK, a rarity at the time, and sold over a million copies there - also a rarity. As if that wasn't enought, "We Can Work It Out" was the Beatles' sixth-consecutive No. 1 single in the United States, a record at the time, and far surpassed "Day Tripper" in popularity there. If there is one moment that best illustrated the subtle shift in control within the Beatles from Lennon to McCartney, it was the greater success of the mellow "We Can Work It Out" than the harder-rock "Day Tripper." After this, Paul McCartney asserted himself more and more until he virtually took control of the Beatles.

We Can Work It Out paulmccartney.filminspector.com


Finally, there was a court case in England around 2012 regarding tapped private telephone calls stolen by media types (calling them "journalists" doesn't really seem appropriate somehow). One of the tapped phone calls was from Paul McCartney to Heather Mills in which Paul sang "We Can Work It Out" to Heather, somewhat pathetically. Obviously, the song meant, and means, a lot to Paul McCartney, and clearly it has meant a lot to other people, too.


We Can Work It Out paulmccartney.filminspector.com


"We Can Work It Out" appeared on "Yesterday and Today," released in 1966, "A Collection of Beatles Oldies," also released in 1966, and "Past Masters," released in 1988. It also, of course, appears on "1," released in 2000, while Paul issued a live version on his 2002 "Back in the U.S."

Try to see it my way
Do I have to keep on talking
Till I can't go on?

While you see it your way
Run the risk of knowing that
Our love may soon be gone
We can work it out
We can work it out

Think of what you're saying
You can get it wrong and still
You think that it's all right

Think of what I'm saying
We can work it out and
Get it straight or say goodnight
We can work it out
We can work it out

Life is very short
And there's no time
For fussing and fighting, my friend

I have always thought
That it's a crime
So I will ask you once again

Try to see it my way
Only time will tell
If I am right or I am wrong

While you see it your way
There's a chance that we might
Fall apart before too long
We can work it out
We can work it out

Life is very short
And there's no time
For fussing and fighting, my friend

I have always thought
That it's a crime
So I will ask you once again

Try to see it my way
Only time will tell
If I am right or I am wrong

While you see it your way
There's a chance that we might
Fall apart before too long
We can work it out
We can work it out

We Can Work It Out paulmccartney.filminspector.com

2018

No comments:

Post a Comment