Sunday, July 29, 2012

The Back Seat of my Car


Back Seat of My Car paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Apple Records released "Back Seat of My Car" in the United Kingdom.




Paul McCartney wrote "The Back Seat of My Car" in early 1969 for a film project that the Beatles were considering. As such, it was part of the "Let It Be" sessions that surfaced a year later. However, the Beatles had a lot of fine material to clear on their final album, and "The Back Seat of My Car" didn't make the cut.

Back Seat of My Car paulmccartney.filminspector.com


So, rather than let a good song go to waste, Paul simply put it on his own album, "Ram," released on 13 August 1971 (the United Kingdom only). This is another of Paul's songs that has a soft, melodic pace along with some nice orchestration by the New York Philharmonic. "Back Seat of My Car" has a George Martin feel to it, but Paul and Linda are credited as producers. Paul has said:
"Back Seat of My Car" is the ultimate teenage song, and even though it was a long time since I was a teenager and had to go to a girl's dad and explain myself, it's that kind of meet-the-parents song. It's a good old driving song. [Sings] "We can make it to Mexico City." I've never driven to Mexico City, but it's imagination. And obviously "back seat" is snogging, making love.
While John Lennon took offense to the song as a sort of veiled attack on him, it seems more reflective of Paul's own infatuation with Linda McCartney. In any event, it is a pretty song and very underrated, but enjoyed more by music critics than by the public. Released as a single in the UK only, "Back Seat of My Car" topped out only at No. 39 during a low period for McCartney on the charts. Paul appears to have completely forgotten "Back Seat of My Car" and never plays it at concerts.

Back Seat of My Car paulmccartney.filminspector.com


2018

Too Many People


Ram paulmccartney.filminspector.com




"Too Many People" is a Paul McCartney album track off of "Ram" and was used as the B side of the "Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey" single. This is one of Paul's controversial songs of the early 1970s when he was working off of a lot of anger from the Beatles breakup and indecision about how much to sing in support of various anti-establishment influences of the time.

Ram paulmccartney.filminspector.com


Paul later said about "Too Many People":
I was looking at my second solo album, Ram, the other day and I remember there was one tiny little reference to John in the whole thing. He'd been doing a lot of preaching, and it got up my nose a little bit. In one song, I wrote, "Too many people preaching practices", I think is the line. I mean, that was a little dig at John and Yoko. There wasn't anything else on it that was about them. Oh, there was "You took your lucky break and broke it in two."
Naturally, some think the entire song is directed at Lennon, especially since the very first two words are "Piss off." One can interpret the album's title, "Ram," as Paul giving John the horns. But then, it may just refer to... a ram.

Ram paulmccartney.filminspector.com


 It's amusing to reflect that Paul got a lot of flack upon release of  "Ram," especially some snide comments from his former bandmates. It generally was rated a lot lower than albums from the other former Beatles around this time.

Ram paulmccartney.filminspector.com


Over time, Ram's reputation has grown to the point that many think this is among Paul's best work. However, there are a lot of tracks on it that are quite good but largely forgotten due to the popularity of much of Paul's other work. "Too Many People" is one of them.


2018

Bluebird


Mrs. Vanderbilt Bluebird paulmccartney.filminspector.com



"Bluebird" is an album track off of Paul McCartney and Wings' "Band on the Run." It appeared as the B-side of the "Mrs. Vanderbilt" single in continental Europe. As with many of Paul's songs, its creation is lost in murkiness, with some sources claiming it was written during a Jamaica vacation, other sources stating it was written long before that vacation. Most agree that "Bluebird" is a post-Beatles composition, probably in 1971.

Mrs. Vanderbilt Bluebird paulmccartney.filminspector.com


Paul has a certain fondness for "Bluebird." He recorded a version in 1980 with Jimmy McCulloch and Joe English to include with his apology to Japanese fans for his drug bust that January which prevented him from appearing there. Paul also sang it on his "Wings Over the World" tour in the 1970s, gathering Denny, Linda, and the other into a circle on stage and making it a bit of a sing-a-long. While Paul later added others to Wings, at the time of "Bluebird" the group was down to Paul, Linda, and Denny Laine, so they are the three that appear on the single sleeves.

Mrs. Vanderbilt Bluebird paulmccartney.filminspector.com


Listening to tracks like this really hammers home how important Linda was to the Wings sound. Maybe not the most polished singer, but Linda did contribute.


Mrs. Vanderbilt Bluebird paulmccartney.filminspector.com


LATE AT NIGHT WHEN THE WIND IS STILL
I'LL COME FLYING THROUGH YOUR DOOR.
AND YOU'LL KNOW WHAT LOVE IS FOR,
I'M A BLUEBIRD,
I'M A BLUEBIRD, I'M A BLUEBIRD, I'M A BLUEBIRD, YEAH, YEAH, YEAH.
I'M A BLUEBIRD, I'M A BLUEBIRD, I'M A BLUEBIRD, YEAH, YEAH, YEAH.

TOUCH YOUR LIPS WITH A MAGIC KISS
AND YOU'LL BE A BLUEBIRD TOO.
AND YOU'LL KNOW WHAT LOVE CAN DO.
I'M A BLUEBIRD,
I'M A BLUEBIRD, I'M A BLUEBIRD, I'M A BLUEBIRD, YEAH, YEAH, YEAH.
I'M A BLUEBIRD, I'M A BLUEBIRD, I'M A BLUEBIRD, YEAH, YEAH, YEAH.

BLUEBIRD, (bluebird) AH HA,
BLUEBIRD, (bluebird) AH HA,
BLUEBIRD, (bluebird) AH AH AH.

FLY AWAY THROUGH THE MIDNIGHT AIR
AS WE HEAD ACROSS THE SEA.
AND AT LAST WE WILL BE FREE.
YOU'RE A BLUEBIRD,
YOU'RE A BLUEBIRD, YOU'RE A BLUEBIRD, YOU'RE A BLUEBIRD, YEAH, YEAH, YEAH.
YOU'RE A BLUEBIRD, YOU'RE A BLUEBIRD, YOU'RE A BLUEBIRD, YEAH, YEAH, YEAH.

AT LAST WE WILL BE FREE,
BLUEBIRD, LIKE ME,
AT LAST WE WILL BE FREE.

ALL ALONE ON A DESERT ISLAND
WE'RE LIVING IN THE TREES.
AND WE'RE FLYING IN THE BREEZE.
WE'RE THE BLUEBIRDS, WE'RE THE BLUEBIRDS,
WE'RE THE BLUEBIRDS, WE'RE THE BLUEBIRDS.

SINGING:
BLUEBIRD, (bluebird, bluebird) AH HA

Band on the Run paulmccartney.filminspector.com

2018

Some People Never Know


Paul McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Paul and Linda McCartney in the early 1970s, during his "nature boy" phase.



"Some People Never Know" is an album track on "Wild Life," the debut album of Wings. "Wild Life" was released on 7 December 1971 and was met by indifference by most of the record-buying audience. The album peaked at No. 10 in the United States and No. 11 in the United Kingdom, easily the worst performance for a Paul McCartney studio album until "Press to Play" in 1986. Paul recorded this at home as a demo for "Ram" in May-August 1970, but it didn't make the cut for "Ram." It did, however, find a place on "Wild Life."

Paul McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com


There are nice harmonies on "Some People Never Know." If performed by a less legendary figure, this would be a well-remembered, if somewhat bland, tune. For Paul McCartney, it is nothing special, and basically has disappeared except for pressings of "Wild Life." Paul and Wings played it in ten concerts in 1972, and then it disappeared forever. Of course, "Wild Life" itself is largely forgotten except for Wings completists, but it is a solid album that just needs a little more energy. The line-up of the group at this time was Paul, Linda McCartney, Denny Laine, and Denny Seiwell on drums and percussion.



No one else will ever see how much faith you have in me,
Only fools would disagree that it's so,
Some people never know.

Like a fool I'm far away,
Ev'ry night I hope and pray
I'll be coming home to stay and it's so
Some people never know.

Some people can sleep at night time,
Believing that love is a lie.
I'm only a person like you, love,
And who in the world can be right
All the right time,
I know I was wrong,
Make me right, right.

Only love can stand the test,
Only you outshine the rest,
Only fools take second best, and it's so,
Some people never know

Paul McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com


2018

Bip Bop


Paul McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com
Paul and Linda McCartney sing "Bip Bop."



"Bip Bop" is an album track off of Paul McCartney and Wings' first album in 1971, "Wild Life." It is kind of a throw-away song, though, as with just about any Paul song, there are those who claim this is one of his top compositions. "Wild Life" is a fun album, not full of big hits but with interesting sounds. It is Paul's "forgotten album," if that is possible with such a legendary figure.

The grainy music video for "Bip Bop" - not intended as a "music video" as we know them now, but simply recorded as a promotional film - was recorded in the garden of Paul's Scotland home circa June 1971. The bluegrass-styled "Bip Bop" features Paul and Linda, with Linda's daughter Mary giggling in the background.


Paul McCartney paulmccartney.filminspector.com


2018

Picasso's Last Words (Drink to Me)





"Picasso's Last Words (Drink to Me)" is a classic album track off of "Band on the Run." It was one of those rare songs that resulted from a bit of a dare. Another famous example of this sort of "inspiration" was the 1968 song "Mony Mony" by Tommy James and the Shondells. The story with that one goes (there are several different versions of this story) is that someone dared Tommy James to write a song about the first thing that he saw after they left lunch. Well, he got out into the street and saw a sign for a bank, Mutual of New York. So, James wrote "Mony Mony," which became another in a string of hits for him. This probably an apocryphal story, at least in part - but it's a good story.



Anyway, the story behind "Picasso's Last Words" is something along those lines. Paul McCartney later recounted:
On one of our Jamaican holidays we had heard that Dustin Hoffman and Steve McQueen were around, shooting the film Papillon. We were invited to visit the set and Dustin asked us back to his house for dinner. He was asking me how I write songs; I explained that I just make them up. He said, Can you make up a song about anything?' I wasn't sure, but he pulled out a copy of Time, pointed to an article and said, 'Could you write a song about this? It was a quote from Picasso, from the last night of his life. Apparently, he had said to his friends, 'Drink to me, drink to my health, you know I can't drink anymore,' and then gone to bed and died in his sleep. So I picked up a guitar, started to strum and sing 'Drink to me, drink to my health...', and Dustin was shouting to his wife, 'He's doing it! He's doing it! Come and listen!' It's something that comes naturally to me but he was blown away by it. And that song became Picasso’s Last Words.
Dustin Hoffman himself has verified that this was the genesis of "Picasso's Last Words (Drink to Me)." However, the song is credited to Paul McCartney and Wings' sessions in Lagos, Nigeria, so exactly how much of the song came about in Jamaica and how much in Nigeria is a bit unclear. "Picasso's Last Words" itself was recorded at former Cream drummer Ginger Baker's home studio in Ikeja, Nigeria. You can hear Baker banging a tin can full of gravel in the background.



2018

Mamunia


Mamunia paulmccartney.filminspector.com





"Mamunia" is an album track on Paul McCartney and Wings' "Band on the Run" album. It was the B-side of some copies of the successful "Jet" single released on 28 January 1974. Paul McCartney (it also is credited to Linda) wrote "Mamunia" in Marrakesh and its inspiration was the name of the hotel in which Paul was staying - "Mamounia." Paul pulled it out in Lagos, Nigeria during the recording sessions for "Band on the Run" a few months later.

Mamunia paulmccartney.filminspector.com

"Mamunia" is one of the most under-rated songs in the entire career of Paul McCartney. If you like light, fluffy, bouncy pop songs without much deeper meaning, it is a great listen. The music video was produced by Jim Quick in July 1974 and appeared on the 2007 video set "The McCartney Years."


2018